Monday, December 18, 2017

Star Wars: The Narrative Awakens

Well this was no surprise.

From: Vanity Fair

Yes there is a ticked-off splinter of the Star Wars fandom angered by The Last Jedi. These MAGA-esque fanboys—the same that called Rey a “Mary Sue” or lost their marbles over the 2016 all-female Ghostbusters reboot before it even hit theaters—have been spreading their over-blown hatred all over social media. As you might imagine, those “fans”—who seem to take their cues from First Order supremacists Hux and Kylo rather than Resistance heroes Rey, Finn, and Poe—aren’t very comfortable with the film’s more progressive messages. Their hysteria-tinged reactions are best ignored.


People who hate Star Wars the Last Jedi are basement dwelling man-babies, who have never had a date.  Last I knew that was supposed to be the description of guys who loved Star Wars in general although certainly not this heap of shit in particular. 

Honestly, The Last Jedi (AKA The Last Star Wars Movie I'm Ever Seeing.) Is the Star Wars movie for people who hate Star Wars fans.  




The Last Jedi mocks courage, heroics, and heroism. Poe Dameron, the cocky fighter pilot, risks his life and the lives of his teammates to destroy the most formidable ship hunting the Resistance, and for this is upbraided and demoted. Later, faced with a no-win scenario, he concocts a desperate plan to disable the First Order’s tracking, allowing the remnants of the Resistance to escape and live to fight another day. Not only does the plan fail, it results in the deaths of some 2/3rds of what few members of the Resistance were left. And when Finn, a non-entity through most of the film, is about to sacrifice his own life to save even that pitiful remnant, he is knocked off course by a fellow rebel, and the First Order’s weapon is allowed to fire. His self-sacrifice, the intervening character says, is stupid and pointless because that’s just the way it is.

The only time anyone is allowed to sacrifice themselves heroically, is when Vice Admiral Tumblr Hair (played by Laura Dern) gets to blow up the entire First Order fleet whilst dying heroically, but even this sacrifice is meaningless: Kylo Ren and General Hux survive, and are able to mount an assault on the planetary base the Rebels fled to, an assault that is more than twice as large as the one Vader launched against Hoth. Tumblr Hair dies for nothing. In this movie, all heroics are meaningless, and that is just not Star Wars.


When Star Wars came out in 1977 it wasn't just a breath of fresh air it was more like a hurricane.  Easy Rider, Taxi Driver. China Town.  The movies of the 1970s were absolutely drenched in nihilism.  Nothing real was worth fighting for because nothing ever really mattered.  And then with the blast of the first note of John Williams score Star Wars stormed on to the screens and said, yes Virginia there are things that worth fighting for.  Generation X was absolutely in love with a screen hero for the first time.   Here was a a guy not much older than we were who when faced with the choice of becoming a drifter-nobody on Tatooine (due to the destruction of his family and farm) or becoming a hero, chose to be a hero.  For the early 1970s characters being a sobby quitter would have been the more natural choice but it wasn't Luke's and it wasn't ours.

Now the SJWs are parading around in Star Wars' skin demanding respect but they won't get it.   #NotMyStarWars


4 comments:

Lovekraft said...

In our neck of the woods, anyone who cares what Vanity Fair thinks is a fossil, an anti-science and anti-truth smug douchenozzle.

Similar to Twitter's blue verification mark: it's a sign of someone who props up the corrupt system.

Mr. Bee said...

Disney Star Warz: SJW converged or just re-written to pump up Chinese ticket sales?

Man of the Atom said...

Yes there is a ticked-off splinter of the Star Wars fandom angered by The Last Jedi. These MAGA-esque fanboys—the same that called Rey a “Mary Sue” or lost their marbles over the 2016 all-female Ghostbusters reboot before it even hit theaters—have been spreading their over-blown hatred all over social media. As you might imagine, those “fans”—who seem to take their cues from First Order supremacists Hux and Kylo rather than Resistance heroes Rey, Finn, and Poe—aren’t very comfortable with the film’s more progressive messages. Their hysteria-tinged reactions are best ignored.

People who hate Star Wars the Last Jedi are basement dwelling man-babies, who have never had a date. Last I knew that was supposed to be the description of guys who loved Star Wars in general although certainly not this heap of shit in particular.


Wasn't this the response that the gaming media gave to another disaffected group of 'wrongfans'? Tiny 'splinter' of the fans, and totally ignorable?

Hey, Vanity Fair. How'd that turn out again? Could you refresh me on that, please?

Shitlord Numéro Uno said...

When I read your description of TLJ's plot, it hit me like a slap in the face - it's a postmodern take on Star Wars. This is made even more hideous by the fact that, as you said, the original movies themselves were a reaction against postmodernism in a way. Grand, sweeping narratives, unambiguous struggles of good against evil, villains who are badder than bad and likable heroes who do things that actually fucking matter.

People always talk about why Star Wars caught on - THAT was why. Moral relativism is poison, humans are not meant to live like that. Everybody in a culture needs a common OS. Star Wars tapped into deep human longings and was in the right place at the right time.

The Last Jedi is the triumph of postmodernism. Every grand narrative has been deconstructed, every hero dragged through the fucking muck and ridiculed. All meaning, mystery and grandeur has been sucked out and sent spiraling into the void.

No wonder all the soy boy turds out there fucking love it, they don't have an ounce of heroism in them. Two hundred years ago they'd have all been killed by disease or otherwise swept from the board early. Now they can survive and kill sci fi fantasy franchises.